DENTIST DENTAL CLINIC OFFICE BURNABY

My Smile Health Dental

Health Focused • Holistic Approach

My Smile Health Dental

Health Focused • Holistic Approach

There are two two important concepts to understand about Oral wounds

Remember:

Helpful Tips

Normal Post-Treatment Occurrences

Increased fussiness and inconsolable crying during first week
Make sure you stay ahead of discomfort and be proactive with pain medications.
Bleeding after stretching
A little bit of blood in a pool of saliva appears worse than it really is. If this occurs, nothing needs to be done and it is safe to feed immediately.
Trouble with latch during first week
Due to the initial soreness and re-learning of suck, feedings may be inconsistent the first week. In some cases, latch or symptoms may worsen before they get better. It is critical to work with an IBCLC for any feeding related issues.
Increased choking and spitting up
Some babies may have a harder time adjusting to an increased milk flow. This is usually temporary and should be addressed with your IBCLC.
Increased drooling and saliva bubbles
The healing process increases saliva production. Also, your infant may be adjusting to a new range of motion and can have difficulty controlling saliva. This is usually temporary.
Increased sleeping
This may be due to medication, exhaustion, or that the infant is feeling better and is more satisfied. Sleep may act as a coping mechanism for discomfort

When you need to call the doctor

Although rare, please do not hesitate to call or text Dr. Ivy Yu at 604-617-9091 if you experience the following:
Thank you so much for choosing us! We truly wish you and your baby a fast and easy recovery. Understand that feeding problems are quite common so you are not alone. Please reach out for emotional support from others who understand.
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Home Care Information For Post-Op Frenectomy (New Borns & Infants)

What You May Expect After The Procedure

Please note that not all babies follow the typical healing timeline depicted below.

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Baby will be sore, expect fussiness
Soreness starts to taper off day 7-10
Implement suck training exercises 2- 3x daily
Post-op stretching routine no longer necessary, gentle messaging of new frenulum encouraged
Healing “white patch” forms, this is “nature’s ban-aid”
Baby may be fussy
Healing patch shrinking
Healing patch gone and new frenulum takes final shape and position
Pain meds given as needed
Baby is re- learning how to suck
New frenulum forming
Bodywork, OT, PT, AND LC follow-ups as needed
May have trouble with latch
Feedings may be inconsistent
Bodywork and LC follow ups as needed
Continual progress with feeding
Have back up feeding plan and comfort measures prepared
LC follow up within the first 5 days is highly recommended establish daily tummy time routine
Start to see signs of improvement with feeding

Pain Management Recommendations

Under 6 Months

Infant Acetaminophen/Tylenol (80mg/1ml concentration) ____________________ ml Dose based on weight; given every 6-8 hours for first few days as needed for pain

Over 6 Months

If infant is older than two months and Tylenol is ineffective, get consent from pediatrician for Ibuprofen use. Infant Drops lbuprofen/Advii/Motrin (40mg/ml concentration) ml Dose based on weight; given every 6-8 hours for first few days as needed for pain

What are the "White Diamond" Healing Patches?

The released area will form a wet, soft scab after the first day. This is nature's "band-aid," and while typically white in color, in some cases it is yellow. The diamond will peak in size by day seven and then start to shrink over the following week.

The released area will form a wet, soft scab after the first day. This is nature’s “band-aid” and while typically white in color, in some cases it is yellow. The diamond will peak in size by day seven and then start to shrink over the following week. 


Stretch each side six times a day for the first two weeks through the day. Then stretch the site three times a day for four weeks, for a total of six weeks. Stretching should only take five to ten seconds at a time. It’s best to be quick and careful with your movements. It is NOT recommended to go without stretches for more than six hours. If your baby sleeps longer than six hours, then wake the baby once between sleeps to do one more.



Stretching Protocol

Lingual Frenum (Tongue)

There is only one stretch for under the tongue.  With clean hands, place the pointer or pinky finger under the tongue, push down and scoop the tongue up towards the roof of the mouth. Then push down and swipe from one side to the other to ensure the site was stretched, as it is harder to see what you are doing under the tongue

Stretch the tongue up (indicated by arrow shown) and hold for 5 seconds. You should be able to see the entire diamond stretching vertically.

Labial Frenum (Lip)

With clean hands, pull the lip out and up (no need to hold it for a certain amount of time; this flanges the lip out similar to breastfeeding). For the second stretch, using an adequate amount of pressure, place your finger all the way up under the lip and rub from one side of the site to the other, then roll the finger from the gum across the site in the direction of the nose.